Tag: books

Inside Fatherhood drafts: a champion for male mental health

Paul Gask went off the rails.

A stressful job and a male-dominated culture of macho behaviour left him on the verge of a complete breakdown.

But Paul found strength in his role as a father and now works with men to champion issues around mental health, suicide and taking back control.

I recently interviewed Paul [pictured above] for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a preview of his moving story:

“I tried to process why he hadn’t said anything to me. I couldn’t cope with the grief but, when I sent to see the welfare officer, they told me to ‘pull myself together’. I couldn’t admit I had a mental health problem to my employer. I didn’t even know that I might have one. I knew the stigma attached to it. In that kind of working culture, men just didn’t talk about their feelings.”

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.

Inside fatherhood drafts: newly reunited dad Chris Hardy

Chris knows extremes.

Indeed, he had seen the more extreme side of life at close quarters.

But he relinquished a life spiralling into self destruction and violence for the love of his son — and they’re now planning their first summer holiday together.

I recently interviewed Chis [pictured above] for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a preview of his moving story:

“I was overcome with rage against the unfairness. I simply locked myself in my room and remember consciously declaring war on the world. I wanted revenge on my bullies — and I had it within months. I wanted to give the world a good hiding. After that, violence follows wherever you go.”

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.

 

Inside fatherhood drafts: life changes for stepdad Dom

Dom wasn’t planning to be a father figure. Hell, he didn’t even want kids.

Besides, he was too busy building a career and going on tour with his band.

But life has a habit of throwing your curveballs and that’s exactly how Dom found himself going from nought to 60 into parenthood — virtually overnight.

One day, hanging out backstage with the band. The next, a suburban house, a ready-made family unit and a dog.

I interviewed musician and entrepreneur Dom Smith [pictured above] as the latest case study for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a taste of his experience of fatherhood:

“I’m not a stereotypical disciplinarian. But that’s what not being a dad by blood does for you — it lets you stand back and take stock more.

“We talk about video games, comic books and music. Our dynamic is pretty chilled out. He’s just a good kid with a taste for rebellion.

“I’m not always comfortable with the role but being a parent and getting him to listen to me is what I’ve got to do. Hell, I didn’t even know I had this authoritarian voice inside me.”

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.

Inside Fatherhood drafts: deployed dad Steve Martin

homecoming-beaver-90

Steve saw the world. He knew the freedom of being at sea as a serving sailor but his blow-with-the-wind independence came at a price.

The guilt. With a wife and two young boys left behind on shore, he found a life at sea was increasingly hard to square with his conscience as a husband and father.

Steve [pictured above at a quay-side reunion in the Eighties] has since left the Royal Navy and told me about the problem of juggling a military career with a family.

It was my latest case-study interview for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a taste of his experience of fatherhood:

“Most of us would take ourselves off to a quiet place and sit alone with our thoughts. It sounds really girly but I used to tell the kids to look at the moon and think about how I was looking at the same moon.

“I sent them postcards from all over the world and wrote them both individual letters. In return, they would send me voice tapes. The tapes got me every time.

“Those were the moments I’d have to shut the door and put up the ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign.”

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.