Tag: fatherhood

Inside fatherhood drafts: life changes for stepdad Dom

Dom wasn’t planning to be a father figure. Hell, he didn’t even want kids.

Besides, he was too busy building a career and going on tour with his band.

But life has a habit of throwing your curveballs and that’s exactly how Dom found himself going from nought to 60 into parenthood — virtually overnight.

One day, hanging out backstage with the band. The next, a suburban house, a ready-made family unit and a dog.

I interviewed musician and entrepreneur Dom Smith [pictured above] as the latest case study for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a taste of his experience of fatherhood:

“I’m not a stereotypical disciplinarian. But that’s what not being a dad by blood does for you — it lets you stand back and take stock more.

“We talk about video games, comic books and music. Our dynamic is pretty chilled out. He’s just a good kid with a taste for rebellion.

“I’m not always comfortable with the role but being a parent and getting him to listen to me is what I’ve got to do. Hell, I didn’t even know I had this authoritarian voice inside me.”

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.

Bring on 2017

img_0012

Time for a break.

I’m pressing pause for new posts over the next few weeks. It’s time to regroup and plan ahead.

But I’ll be back in January 2017 with new projects, ideas and commissions.

Already in progress? A cinephile’s guide to Cannes [above], Teggy in Snowdonia and other Welsh legends, plus more drafts from my forthcoming book, Inside Fatherhood.

Look out for me on the genius bar at the Telegraph Cruise Show in London in January. Better still, come and say hello.

And sign up for my newsletter below. Next issue out mid Jan.

Thanks for reading this year.

Inside Fatherhood drafts: deployed dad Steve Martin

homecoming-beaver-90

Steve saw the world. He knew the freedom of being at sea as a serving sailor but his blow-with-the-wind independence came at a price.

The guilt. With a wife and two young boys left behind on shore, he found a life at sea was increasingly hard to square with his conscience as a husband and father.

Steve [pictured above at a quay-side reunion in the Eighties] has since left the Royal Navy and told me about the problem of juggling a military career with a family.

It was my latest case-study interview for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a taste of his experience of fatherhood:

“Most of us would take ourselves off to a quiet place and sit alone with our thoughts. It sounds really girly but I used to tell the kids to look at the moon and think about how I was looking at the same moon.

“I sent them postcards from all over the world and wrote them both individual letters. In return, they would send me voice tapes. The tapes got me every time.

“Those were the moments I’d have to shut the door and put up the ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign.”

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.

Inside Fatherhood drafts: Stay-at-home-dad Dave Hollins

img_0612

Dave looks well. Lean and fit, there’s no outward sign of the accident that changed his life.

But, after talking with him for a few hours, I come to realise how struggling with epilepsy has impacted on family life.

Dave [pictured above] found a new role as a pioneering stay-at-home dad. But, with his three boys now growing up and an empty nest looming, what does the future hold for the dedicated dad?

Dave was my third interviewee for Inside Fatherhood, my forthcoming book to be published by BRF in 2018.

Here’s a taste of his experience of fatherhood:

“I don’t see why a bloke can’t look after the kids — if you’ve got the time. There’s nothing a woman can do that a man can’t,” says Dave of his early days in the role.

But he does rue the way the image of the Fairy Liquid mother is still engrained in our collective consciousness as a society, an image further reinforced by the media.

Dave was first reluctant to join the local toddler groups when Jack was first born as he was put off by the reactions of the mothers around him. “It was 2003 and I was the only bloke in the room,” he says.

Do you have an experience of fatherhood to share? Contact me if you would be interviewed for the book.