Tag: Freelance

Journalists and content writers: sign up for my new masterclass this autumn

Journalism is complex but the secret to good storytelling is simple: people love to read about people.

This new course, hosted via Journalism.co.uk [see image above], is a hands-on class exploring techniques for writers, such as case studies, sourcing expert views and playing up the human interest to build empathy with your readers.

It will make your stories really come alive.

This four-week course will be taught online. This includes one lesson per week over four consecutive weeks on the same day, plus practical exercises, ongoing feedback and a critique of a draft feature for your chosen publication.

This course is suitable for all professional writers — from career starters beginning their writing career to established journalists looking to refine their skillset in an increasingly competitive freelance market.

What does the course involve?

  • Session 1: Telling stories
  • Session 2: Finding voices
  • Session 3: Handling interviews
  • Sessions 4: Writing a draft

Sign up here: Storytelling and engagement techniques masterclass

How to get into travel writing — via Zoom

The landscape looks pretty different since my last post.

Global events have overtaken normal life and we’re all now staying home to protest out precious NHS.

It’s easy to hide under the duvet at times like these but, as a long-standing freelancer, I know it means I need to change, adapt and evolve my working life.

I had a writing workshop lined up in Chester later this month, offering my insider tips from the coalface of freelance travel writing.

Obviously we couldn’t now meet physically. But one of the delegates inspired me with her positivity to not cancel the event. Instead we did it by Zoom.

I prepared a short PowerPoint and did two Zoom sessions with some homework set between the two online tutorials.

It’s a very different way of teaching for me from my usual workshops and university lectures but it proved yet again that adaptability is a cornerstone of freelance life.

I’m available for travel writing workshops and tutorials — both online and, eventually, in person.

Contact me if you would like to take part in a future workshop.

How to get into travel writing at the Chester Literature Festival

The Chester Literature Festival was in full swing this week.

I was there on Friday to run a travel-writing workshop [pictured above] for future freelancers and career changers seeking to branch out.

Some planned to pitch ideas to magazines, others were looking to develop their voice online as a blogger.

I ran this workshop as a taster session but, given the interest on the day for a sold-out event, I will look at future workshops for the new year.

Meanwhile, as part of the session, I shared my top six travel-writing tips as follows:

People, not places

The best travel stories are not about places. They’re about the people who live in those places.

So talk to local people and weave this into your narrative. Nothing adds life to a story like direct speech.

Find a story

A lot of travel stories are very information led. But the stories that really stand out tell proper stories. So find a real story, get a proper angle, think about your readership. Then frame these elements in the context of a destination.

Get it right

Commissioning editors don’t have the time, nor the inclination, to correct your spelling, cut down your copy if you bust your word count and punctuate your sentences. Want more work? Then get it right.

Work with the medium

And not against it. Writing for print? You have the luxury of longer sentences and more descriptive language. But if you’re writing for online, then take a leaf from George Orwell’s book and keep the language more direct. People are increasingly reading your articles on mobile devices, so format for the screen.

Spot the openings

Publications thrive on regular sections and this is your way in, especially as a first-time contributor. Editors need to fill these sections and often to look to freelancers to plug the gaps. So, read, read and read some more.

 Strictly business

Travel writing is a job. Treat it as such. You’re working as a specialist reporter, covering a niche area. You want to be regarded as a professional? Then act professionally. And expect to be paid …

Wirral Grammar School for Girls: a talk about careers in arts and humanities

 

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Why chose to study arts and humanities subjects?

That was the theme of a careers talk I led this week for Wirral Grammar School for Girls.

The groups of teenagers aged 14-16 are currently considering what subjects to study at A Level.

The majority opt for maths and science but, over three sessions, I looked at why an arts strand of study is equally important.

I also quoted the recent article from The Independent, whereby the comedian Josie Long took Education Secretary Nicky Morgan to task for her “immense, ingrained snobbery” about the arts.

Arts Emergency, the organisation Long has co-founded to get young people into arts subjects, states the arts are important because:

“Without the capacity to think beyond repetition there is no beyond to crisis.”

I went on to talk about how this area lends itself to flexible working and freelance contracts, a hugely growing sector of the economy.

But freelance has pros and cons as follows:

Freelancing means

  • Be your own boss
  • Greater variety and fresh challenges
  • Flexibility for busy lifestyles
  • Take more control of your own tax and pension planning
  • Chose your own projects – sometimes it’s good to say ‘no’

But freelancing also means

  • Irregular hours and income
  • The need for a military-stlye self discipline
  • You have to keep good records of you income and expenses
  • You cane feel like you’re never off duty
  • You are only as good as your last commission

Here are some of the comments from the group when I asked them to jot down some feedback after the lecture:

“I now know my father should stop laughing at my interest in arts and English. You gave me confidence – thanks. I will also re-start my blog. Very inspiring talk.”

“I found there are more jobs out there that you can go into without the more academic subjects. It was interesting to hear all the different ways you can make money from writing.”

“It is as hard as I thought it would be to get a job in journalism. But, I learnt, blogs are a good way to start.”

“I learnt that a lot more can be achieved freelance than I originally thought. Arts and English are much more valuable than I thought.”

“I enjoyed the simple, honest way it was presented. It has made me want a career in journalism even more.”

“I learnt that you don’t have to study maths and science to get an interesting job.”

GAZETTEER

Arts Emergency: Why the arts and humanities matter

Josie Long: ‘Belittling the arts is not funny, Education Secretary’

Liked this? Try also National Freelancers Day: A talk for Leeds University Media students.

Do you agree that choosing arts and humanities can help secure your future career? Share your thoughts below.